Celebrating the Abundance Provided by American Agriculture

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March 25, 2014

Happy National Agriculture Day! Today is a great day for everyone in the U.S. to reflect on and celebrate our safe and abundant food supply. Agriculture provides almost everything we eat, use and wear on a daily basis. National Ag Day provides us with an opportunity to recognize agriculture’s contribution to our nation’s security, our strong economy, and our safe, affordable food supply.

The Fertilizer Institute (TFI) is a proud supporter of the celebration of the 41st National Agriculture Day.  American farmers today are producing more abundant and nutritious food than ever in history, while minimizing their impact on the environment. Through a cycle of continuous improvement, including the use of 4R Nutrient Stewardship (use of the right fertilizer source, at the right rate, the right time and in the right place) and conservation measures, they are combining cutting edge technologies with time honored agronomic science to ensure that the world is fed and our precious natural resources are protected. The same spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship that allows U.S. corn farmers to grow 87 percent more corn than they did in 1980, using 4 percent fewer fertilizer nutrients, will lead to even greater efficiency in the future.

 

It is particularly appropriate that today also marks the commemoration of the 100-year anniversary of the birth of Nobel Prize winner and “Father of the Green Revolution,” Dr. Norman E. Borlaug. The statue of Dr. Borlaug, that is being dedicated, today will be displayed at the U.S. Capitol to permanently celebrate the impact of his research and teaching on combatting global hunger.

 

Dr. Borlaug understood that fertilizers are an essential part of the food production equation. In 2008, as the world faced food shortages, Dr. Borlaug told the New York Times, “This is a basic need 6.6 billion people. Without fertilizer, forget it. The game is over.”

For more information on National Agriculture Day, visit http://www.agday.org/